Coronavirus Statement

Ibuprofen and COVID-19 (coronavirus)

We are aware of the ongoing discussion concerning the use of steroids & non-steroidal anti-inflammatory products (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, for the alleviation of COVID-19 symptoms.  Our medical experts pulled together the following perspective to help you navigate the information you are hearing in case you have questions.

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1) What is the current discussion around ibuprofen and COVID19?

There have recently been conflicting reports, particularly in social media channels, questioning whether ibuprofen is linked with worsening of COVID-19 (coronavirus). The World Health Organisation (WHO), the Australian Government’s Department of Health, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) and Consumer Health Products (CHP) have since issued statements confirming an absence of conclusive scientific evidence and data to support this concern.

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2) Will taking ibuprofen (Nurofen) worsen the COVID-19 illness?

Based on all available information, there is currently no proven scientific evidence linking over-the-counter use of ibuprofen to the aggravation (worsening) of COVID-19 (coronavirus).  Ibuprofen is a well-established medicine with a good safety profile that has been used as an effective analgesic (pain-relieving) and anti-pyretic (fever-reducing) medicine in the self-care setting for more than 30 years. 

As with any medicine, we would remind consumers and their caregivers to carefully read and follow the instructions provided on the packaging. If you have any additional questions or concerns, you should speak to a healthcare professional.

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3) If I am already taking ibuprofen, should I stop?

If you have concerns or questions about the appropriateness of your treatment or other options available to you, you should speak to a healthcare professional.

Ibuprofen is a commonly used medicine in the self-care and prescription setting, typically in pain relief and fever reduction. Based on all available information, there is currently no proven scientific evidence linking over-the-counter use of ibuprofen to the aggravation (worsening) of COVID-19 (coronavirus) or to an increased risk of contracting the illness.

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4)  Are there any special considerations for children or the elderly?

As with any medicine, there are specific instructions relating to who should and should not use ibuprofen and how it should be taken. We would remind consumers and their caregivers to carefully read and follow the instructions provided on the packaging. If you have any additional questions or concerns, you should speak to a healthcare professional.

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5) What is Nurofen’s position regarding whether ibuprofen should be used in treating COVID-19 symptoms? 

Based on all available information, there is currently no proven scientific evidence in any population linking over-the-counter use of ibuprofen to the aggravation (worsening) of COVID-19 or to an increased risk of contracting the illness. Ibuprofen is a well-established medicine with a good safety profile that has been used as an effective analgesic (pain reliever) and anti-pyretic (fever-reducing) in the self-care setting for more than 30 years. 

If you have concerns or questions about the appropriateness of your treatment or other options available to you, you should speak to a healthcare professional.

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6) Will taking ibuprofen (Nurofen) increase the risk of contracting COVID-19?

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by a new strain of coronavirus. The virus affects the respiratory system and, based on currently available data, is thought to be most likely spread by droplets from sneezing and coughing.

There is currently no proven scientific evidence establishing a link between the use of ibuprofen or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and an increased risk of contracting COVID‑19.

7) What is ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen is the active ingredient that belongs to a class called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This class of medicines is typically used to relieve pain and / or reduce fever.  Ibuprofen is a well-established and effective medicine that has been used for more than 30 years by billions of consumers in over 90 countries.

If you have concerns or questions about the appropriateness of your treatment or other options available to you, you should speak to a healthcare professional. 

Localised for Australia, dated: March 30, 2020